HOA trade group fights bill that would ease ham radio restriction
Loop North News

CONDOMINIUM LIVING

Nite Owl / Flickr Creative Commons

(Above) Amateur radio equipment. (Click on images to view larger versions.)

HOA trade group fights bill that would ease ham radio restriction

Amateur Radio Parity Act would require associations to provide ‘reasonable accommodation’ of amateur radio.

3-Feb-16 – In a disaster, it is often the only dependable means of two-way communication, but an organization that supports homeowner associations across the United States is opposing a bill that would prevent HOAs from banning amateur radio operation.

Community Association Institute, whose 1,100 Illinois chapter members include association managers, board members, and unit owners, says the Amateur Radio Parity Act is “unnecessary” because the Federal Communications Commission has said it will not get involved with HOA rules that, says the FCC, are “contractual agreements between private parties.”

“Such agreements are voluntarily entered into by the buyer or tenant when the agreement is executed and do not usually concern this Commission,” wrote the FCC in 2012 and repeated in a statement released by CAI on January 12.

Introduced last June by Representative Adam Kinzinger (R-IL), the Amateur Radio Parity Act would direct the FCC to make HOAs, or any private land owner, provide the same “reasonable accommodation” of amateur radio that cities have been required to provide since 1985.

NASA (Left) NASA astronaut Doug Wheelock uses a ham radio system at the International Space Station in 2010.

HOAs, says CAI, are concerned with the outdoor antennas that amateur radio equipment requires, even though it can be no more than a stretch of wire. CAI says its members oppose the legislation “because they support the preservation of the community association model of allowing neighbors to create reasonable rules for their neighborhoods.”

The American Radio Relay League, which represents more than 161,000 ham radio operators, says municipalities can still regulate antenna height and placement, depending on what best fits the community, and the Amateur Radio Parity Act would allow HOAs to do this, as well.

ARRL has an agreement with Federal Emergency Management Agency to provide ham radio assistance, for free, in the event of a national emergency.

“As much as we think we’re sophisticated with technology, things break,” said FEMA administrator Craig Fugate (right) in 2014. “Amateur radio, in a disaster, in a crisis, was often times the one thing that was still up and running. When everything else fails, a ham transmitting can mean the difference between life and death.” Craig Fugate

But taking away an HOA’s right to ban ham radio, says a community association lawyer in California, could result in homeowners installing “massive radio antennas” on their roofs.

David Swedelson “While I may still be enamored by the prospect of communicating with people around the world,” says David Swedelson (left), quoted on CAI’s website, “these days I do that via email, Twitter, and the telephone.”

By Steven Dahlman | Loop North News | sdahlman@loopnorth.com

Published 3-Feb-16 3:21 AM

Loop North News

FREE WEEKLY EMAIL UPDATE

See what’s news in the Loop
and Near North Side.

Signup for our weekly email. No ads and no charge. Just enter your email address here...

Number of subscribers:
See this week’s update

Bill would delete ‘proper purpose’ requirement to see condo records
Detroit’s ‘Man in The City’ art project tours Chicago River
Home hunters better move quickly in hot North Side market
Environmentalists want river-dyeing tradition to end
Gold Coast condo backs away from threat to fine owner over door-dropped letter
Osteria La Madia closes Saturday
Judge denies injunction, says Airbnb ordinance doesn’t impinge homeowner rights
Are condo & HOA bank deposits fully insured by Uncle Sam?
More stories

Thursday
City Club of Chicago presents Howard Tullman, CEO, 1871. Tullman is also General Managing Partner for Chicago-based venture capital funds Chicago High Tech Investment Partners and G2T3V. Over the past 45 years, he has successfully founded more than a dozen high-tech companies. 11:30 a.m. reception, 12:00 p.m. luncheon. Maggiano’s Banquets, 111 West Grand Avenue. Cost: $50. Map. More info.

Thursday
Job Floris, architect and co-founder of the Dutch architecture firm Monadnock, will present a talk about the firm’s practice and their participation in Graham Foundation’s current exhibition, Spaces without drama or surface is an illusion, but so is depth. 6 p.m., Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts, Madlener House, 4 West Burton Place. Map. More info.

Friday
Explore the vivid history of America’s largest Chinatown through the eyes of a new generation in Lauren Yee’s King of the Yees, a Goodman Theatre-commissioned world premiere that was developed in the 2015 New Stages Festival. Yee’s longtime collaborator Joshua Kahan Brody directs her offbeat and electric joy ride about living in the contemporary world while honoring one’s rich ancestral heritage and the conflict that ensues. March 31 through April 30. Tickets: $10-40. Goodman Theatre, 170 North Dearborn Street. Map. More info.

More events

S&P 500
2,358.57 16.98

NASDAQ COMPOSITE
5,875.14 34.77

LOOP/NORTH
40.13 0.30

Biggest Gainers & Losers

UNITED CONTINENTAL HOLDINGS INC.
70.74 2.37

LITTELFUSE INC.
161.24 2.08

BOEING CO.
177.36 1.26

Downtown Chicago Stocks